•  What Happens to Schools In Improvement

     
  • For Title I schools that fail to meet the AYP, also known as adequate yearly progress, established by each state, the law mandates a set of progressive consequences for schools that fail, including public school choice, supplemental educational services, school restructuring, decentralization of the school, reassigning staff, state takeover, and contracting out services. In addition, there are more opportunities for parents to become involved including being informed about the quality of teachers in the school, the development of district and school parental involvement policies, choice of another public school, selection of an outside entity that would provide supplemental education services for students, and participating on a school action team in the case of a low performing school.

     

  • Did You Know?

    • That every Title I school and school district must develop a parent and family engagement policy with the involvement of parents and the community.
    • That the state department of education is obligated to provide Title I schools identified as "low performing" with ideas of model parent involvement programs, and assistance in implementing those programs.